Householder told felling of 'protected' Wirral trees was necessary

Peter Whittle surveys the felled trees

Peter Whittle surveys the felled trees

Peter Whittle surveys the felled trees

Peter Whittle surveys the felled trees

Peter Whittle surveys the felled trees

First published in News
Last updated
Wirral Globe: Photograph of the Author by , Chief Reporter

OFFICIALS have explained to an upset householder that felling mature trees became necessary after inspections revealed they were in a dangerous condition.

Spital resident Peter Whittle called for the introduction of a borough-wide preservation order after oak, lime and beech trees were taken down in woodland at Poulton Road.

Mr Whittle said he understood the woodland is protected by a preservation order.

He claimed there was no public consultation about the felling, or any advance notice it would be going ahead.

The work was carried out by Wirral Council’s parks and countryside department. The local authority said that, although regrettable, it had been done in accordance with policy.

Mr Whittle, who lives nearby, said: "The council should be protecting our green environment - not allowing this unacceptable destruction to go ahead.

"I'm saddened by the loss of these mature trees that have been destroyed by the council, particularly that in this instance they were within an area of woodland supposedly 'protected' by a tree preservation order.

"Apparently, the council's parks service has not followed the due legal process of application, a process which their own planning department has responsibility for administering.

"The council's justification remains unclear to me."

Mark Smith, the authority's head of environment and regulation, said: "The council has a policy for the management of trees adjacent to neighbouring properties.

"The mature trees in question had been inspected and found to be dangerous, and permission to carry out the necessary work was obtained in May 2012.

"One of the trees which had been identified as a safety risk to neighbouring property was felled in 2012 and the remaining work to the other trees has now been carried out, in line with the permission.

"The trees were large and, unfortunately, felling them did result in damage to two smaller trees. It is regrettable when such work is required.

"However, due to the proximity to neighbouring properties it is not intended to plant any replacement trees."

Comments (4)

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4:48pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Positive thinker says...

Be a different headline if they had fallen Mr.Sad
Be a different headline if they had fallen Mr.Sad Positive thinker
  • Score: -3

6:23pm Tue 11 Mar 14

spamfiend says...

My parents house was hit and badly damaged by an old, huge tree during the recent storms, and to be honest after seeing the devastation and heartache caused by it, I will be glad when they cut down the rest of the older trees.

Trees have their place agreed but when they get to the point of being dangerous, then down they should come.
My parents house was hit and badly damaged by an old, huge tree during the recent storms, and to be honest after seeing the devastation and heartache caused by it, I will be glad when they cut down the rest of the older trees. Trees have their place agreed but when they get to the point of being dangerous, then down they should come. spamfiend
  • Score: 6

10:54am Wed 12 Mar 14

Llamedos 1 says...

Hang on folks.....the article states that WBC sought permission to fell the trees in 2012 because of the perceived "danger" they were causing. So if property and life and limb were in dander how come it took so log the fell said danger.....WBC`s usual bull
Hang on folks.....the article states that WBC sought permission to fell the trees in 2012 because of the perceived "danger" they were causing. So if property and life and limb were in dander how come it took so log the fell said danger.....WBC`s usual bull Llamedos 1
  • Score: 6

12:25pm Thu 13 Mar 14

spital1 says...

Firstly, Mr Whittle is not living in the shadow of 80-100ft trees with a fear for loved ones safety every time there are high winds. In light of extreme weather events around the country, it is increasingly evident excessively tall trees within feet of houses should be monitored, maintained and removed if necessary.
Secondly, one of the trees that were felled recently was rotten and it would have only been a matter of time before it fell damaging property or people.
Maybe Mr Whittle should think more about people's safety rather than crying over a couple of trees. Afterall, this has hardly reduced the area to an urban jungle!
Firstly, Mr Whittle is not living in the shadow of 80-100ft trees with a fear for loved ones safety every time there are high winds. In light of extreme weather events around the country, it is increasingly evident excessively tall trees within feet of houses should be monitored, maintained and removed if necessary. Secondly, one of the trees that were felled recently was rotten and it would have only been a matter of time before it fell damaging property or people. Maybe Mr Whittle should think more about people's safety rather than crying over a couple of trees. Afterall, this has hardly reduced the area to an urban jungle! spital1
  • Score: 2

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