CCTV works

IN response to PL Cartlidge's comments on CCTV in Wirral as a serving police officer I find his comments ill-thought out.

The facts are CCTV does deter crime and is a proven asset in the gathering of evidence.

The service provided by the hardworking Council staff is excellent and I can assure him very professional and is not a secret security force.

As an example the evidence gathered from cctv during the disturbances in Birkenhead proved valuable in convicting those responsible.

P B, by email

Comments (7)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

7:41pm Wed 9 Jan 13

porl112 says...

Surely if the money spent on CCTV cameras had been used to employ more Police last years riots could have neen prevented in the first place or at least better controlled. Surely as a serving Police Officer you understand that the greatest deterrent to crime is having a real live Police Officer on patrol?

As a member of the public confronted by rioters which would you rather have a Police Officer present who can arrest the person damaging your property and cart him off to the station or a CCTV camera to record the destruction of your property and maybe even a personal attack upon your own person?

I know which I would rather have.

I have no problem with CCTV in the shopping areas of town and around the town centre but Pt Cartlidge is right these intimidating cameras are appearing everywhere now and must be costing a fortune? Surely it is better to spend any money on real Police than on useless CCTV which I notice didn't stop that girl being attacked in Argyle Street this week!

We should have Coppers not cameras.

CCTV is just money for the security industry and high council taxes and intimidation for the rest of us.

A Wirral Council Tax Payer
Surely if the money spent on CCTV cameras had been used to employ more Police last years riots could have neen prevented in the first place or at least better controlled. Surely as a serving Police Officer you understand that the greatest deterrent to crime is having a real live Police Officer on patrol? As a member of the public confronted by rioters which would you rather have a Police Officer present who can arrest the person damaging your property and cart him off to the station or a CCTV camera to record the destruction of your property and maybe even a personal attack upon your own person? I know which I would rather have. I have no problem with CCTV in the shopping areas of town and around the town centre but Pt Cartlidge is right these intimidating cameras are appearing everywhere now and must be costing a fortune? Surely it is better to spend any money on real Police than on useless CCTV which I notice didn't stop that girl being attacked in Argyle Street this week! We should have Coppers not cameras. CCTV is just money for the security industry and high council taxes and intimidation for the rest of us. A Wirral Council Tax Payer porl112

10:52pm Wed 9 Jan 13

bickyboy says...

I don't think that CCTV and more police officers on the beat are mutually exclusive phenomena. Why should we not have both?

We are being told that the police have been forced to cut back office functions and dismantle the little empires that once filled their swanky HQs, forcing those who are too scared to work in the dark, too rubbish at real police work or too protected by PC dictats to be expected to pound the beat. So now there should be a whole host of people who, apart from a brief period of probation, have never had to walk a beat in their lives, reluctantly emerging from their cosy little offices and into the sunshine to do some genuine law enforcement.

Meantime we still have CCTV so it can't fail! Can it?
I don't think that CCTV and more police officers on the beat are mutually exclusive phenomena. Why should we not have both? We are being told that the police have been forced to cut back office functions and dismantle the little empires that once filled their swanky HQs, forcing those who are too scared to work in the dark, too rubbish at real police work or too protected by PC dictats to be expected to pound the beat. So now there should be a whole host of people who, apart from a brief period of probation, have never had to walk a beat in their lives, reluctantly emerging from their cosy little offices and into the sunshine to do some genuine law enforcement. Meantime we still have CCTV so it can't fail! Can it? bickyboy

4:36pm Thu 10 Jan 13

Thepleb says...

porl112 wrote:
Surely if the money spent on CCTV cameras had been used to employ more Police last years riots could have neen prevented in the first place or at least better controlled. Surely as a serving Police Officer you understand that the greatest deterrent to crime is having a real live Police Officer on patrol?

As a member of the public confronted by rioters which would you rather have a Police Officer present who can arrest the person damaging your property and cart him off to the station or a CCTV camera to record the destruction of your property and maybe even a personal attack upon your own person?

I know which I would rather have.

I have no problem with CCTV in the shopping areas of town and around the town centre but Pt Cartlidge is right these intimidating cameras are appearing everywhere now and must be costing a fortune? Surely it is better to spend any money on real Police than on useless CCTV which I notice didn't stop that girl being attacked in Argyle Street this week!

We should have Coppers not cameras.

CCTV is just money for the security industry and high council taxes and intimidation for the rest of us.

A Wirral Council Tax Payer
I agree there should be more police but the police can't be everywhere and CCTV assists us,so I would rather have more CCTV.
The girl attacked in Birkenhead there were no police officers present but the CCTV captured the incident and the person responsible has been caught.
I am not sure why anyone but would be intimidated by a camera they are used in every shop you walk into and if you are doing nothing wrong what is the problem.
[quote][p][bold]porl112[/bold] wrote: Surely if the money spent on CCTV cameras had been used to employ more Police last years riots could have neen prevented in the first place or at least better controlled. Surely as a serving Police Officer you understand that the greatest deterrent to crime is having a real live Police Officer on patrol? As a member of the public confronted by rioters which would you rather have a Police Officer present who can arrest the person damaging your property and cart him off to the station or a CCTV camera to record the destruction of your property and maybe even a personal attack upon your own person? I know which I would rather have. I have no problem with CCTV in the shopping areas of town and around the town centre but Pt Cartlidge is right these intimidating cameras are appearing everywhere now and must be costing a fortune? Surely it is better to spend any money on real Police than on useless CCTV which I notice didn't stop that girl being attacked in Argyle Street this week! We should have Coppers not cameras. CCTV is just money for the security industry and high council taxes and intimidation for the rest of us. A Wirral Council Tax Payer[/p][/quote]I agree there should be more police but the police can't be everywhere and CCTV assists us,so I would rather have more CCTV. The girl attacked in Birkenhead there were no police officers present but the CCTV captured the incident and the person responsible has been caught. I am not sure why anyone but would be intimidated by a camera they are used in every shop you walk into and if you are doing nothing wrong what is the problem. Thepleb

7:03pm Fri 11 Jan 13

porl112 says...

Thepleb wrote:
porl112 wrote:
Surely if the money spent on CCTV cameras had been used to employ more Police last years riots could have neen prevented in the first place or at least better controlled. Surely as a serving Police Officer you understand that the greatest deterrent to crime is having a real live Police Officer on patrol?

As a member of the public confronted by rioters which would you rather have a Police Officer present who can arrest the person damaging your property and cart him off to the station or a CCTV camera to record the destruction of your property and maybe even a personal attack upon your own person?

I know which I would rather have.

I have no problem with CCTV in the shopping areas of town and around the town centre but Pt Cartlidge is right these intimidating cameras are appearing everywhere now and must be costing a fortune? Surely it is better to spend any money on real Police than on useless CCTV which I notice didn't stop that girl being attacked in Argyle Street this week!

We should have Coppers not cameras.

CCTV is just money for the security industry and high council taxes and intimidation for the rest of us.

A Wirral Council Tax Payer
I agree there should be more police but the police can't be everywhere and CCTV assists us,so I would rather have more CCTV.
The girl attacked in Birkenhead there were no police officers present but the CCTV captured the incident and the person responsible has been caught.
I am not sure why anyone but would be intimidated by a camera they are used in every shop you walk into and if you are doing nothing wrong what is the problem.
I have no problem with cameras on private property or in shops. It is CCTV in public spaces that is the worry.

Video surveillance has not been proven effective

In Britain, where we have more cameras in public places than any other nation on earth, sociologists studying the issue have found that they have not reduced crime. Once the crime and offence figures were adjusted to take account of the general downward trend in crimes and offences reductions were noted in certain categories but there was no evidence to suggest that the cameras had reduced crime overall in the city centre.

In addition, U.S. government experts on security technology, noting that "monitoring video screens is both boring and mesmerizing," have found in experiments that "after only 20 minutes of watching and evaluating monitor screens, the attention of most individuals has degenerated to well below acceptable levels."

CCTV is also susceptible to abuse

One problem with creating such a powerful surveillance system is that experience tells us it will inevitably be abused. There are five ways that surveillance-camera systems are likely to be misused:

1. Criminal abuse

Surveillance systems present law enforcement "bad apples" with a tempting opportunity for criminal misuse. In 1997, for example, a top-ranking police official in Washington, DC was caught using police databases to gather information on patrons of a gay club. By looking up the license plate numbers of cars parked at the club and researching the backgrounds of the vehicles' owners, he tried to blackmail patrons who were married. Imagine what someone like that could do with a citywide spy-camera system like the one we now have on Wirral !

And of course I am sure you are aware of our own Birkenhead CCTV **** video doing the rounds? A few years back somebody at Wirral CCTV copied some of the recordings of young couples copulating in various outdoor locations around Birkenhead and released it onto the internet. There were also videos released casting shame on the town showing drunks fighting and urinating in doorways.

2. Institutional abuse

Sometimes, bad policies are set at the top, and an entire law enforcement agency is turned toward abusive ends. That is especially prone to happen in periods of social turmoil and intense conflict over government policies. During the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War, for example, the FBI – as well as many individual police departments around the nation – conducted illegal operations to spy upon and harass political activists who were challenging racial segregation and the Vietnam War.

This concern is especially justified today since the current rancid right wing government seems hell bent on making the poor poorer and removing peoples rights to a home and any kind of support should they fall on hard times. This is bound to create more social divisions and therefore social and political conflict.

3. Abuse for personal purposes

Powerful surveillance tools also create temptations to abuse them for personal purposes. An investigation by the Detroit Free Press, for example, showed that a database available to Michigan law enforcement was used by officers to help their friends or themselves stalk women, threaten motorists after traffic altercations, and track estranged spouses.

4. Discriminatory targeting

Video camera systems are operated by humans who bring to the job all their existing prejudices and biases. In the UK, camera operators have been found to focus disproportionately on people of color. According to a sociological study of how the systems were operated, "Black people were between one-and-a-half and two-and-a-half times more likely to be surveilled than one would expect from their presence in the population."

5. Voyeurism

Experts studying how the camera systems in Britain are operated have also found that the mostly male (and probably bored) operators frequently use the cameras to voyeuristically spy on women. Fully one in 10 women were targeted for entirely voyeuristic reasons, the researchers found.

Have I changed your mind yet?

If not perhaps you might care to look at this link which shows that councils have spent 500 million pounds on CCTV in the last four years alone! When it comes to CCTV it seems there is no austerity. And, of course, Wirral is about to have to slash essential services to our old folks and other vulnerable groups.

http://www.bigbrothe
rwatch.org.uk/home/2
012/02/price-privacy
-councils-spend-521m
.html

And have a look at this link too. It explains how councils have abused their powers to access our information held by the DVLA to enforce the most petty of offences. Do you really think we should be trusting these guys to 'guard' us with CCTV?

http://www.bigbrothe
rwatch.org.uk/home/2
012/12/dvla-tackle-2
94-public-organisati
ons-for-database-abu
se.html

And, could I ask you where you think this will end? We started with CCTV in shops. Then it was put in our town centres. Now it is appearing everywhere across our town. Are you in favour of putting it in our homes too? Perhaps in your bedroom to make sure you aren't smacking your wife? After all you have nothing to worry about if you are not doing anything wrong have you?

You may think that sounds far fetched but have a look at this link. It shows how hidden CCTV is being used in schools across the UK. And that includes school toilets and changing rooms.

http://www.bigbrothe
rwatch.org.uk/home/2
012/12/dvla-tackle-2
94-public-organisati
ons-for-database-abu
se.html

Imagine if Sir Jimmy Saville had got himself a job monitoring those cameras! Imagine the fun he could have had !

Still in favour? Then, let me go on.

Video surveillance also has a chilling effect on public life

The growing presence of public cameras will bring subtle but profound changes to the character of our public spaces. When citizens are being watched by the authorities -- or aware they might be watched at any time -- they are more self-conscious and less free-wheeling. As syndicated columnist Jacob Sullum has pointed out, "knowing that you are being watched by armed government agents tends to put a damper on things. You don't want to offend them or otherwise call attention to yourself." Eventually, he warns, "people may learn to be careful about the books and periodicals they read in public, avoiding titles that might alarm unseen observers. They may also put more thought into how they dress, lest they look like terrorists, gang members, druggies or hookers." Indeed, the studies of cameras in the UK found that people deemed to be "out of time and place" with the surroundings were subjected to prolonged surveillance.

And finally, the latest CCTV systems are able to identify a person by their face and their walk in seconds. Can you imagine the immense and terrifying power that will give to any kind of fascist government that may get themselves elected in the future?

Can you imagine how much more difficult life would have been for the Jewish and French Resistance in the Second World War had the Natzis had access to such technology?

No, CCTV is expensive. It doesn't prevent crime it merely displaces it. It creates the fear of crime. It kills individuality, free protest and difference. It encourages snooping and corrupts the camera operators by creating voyeurs and peeping Toms and it costs a fortune. Money that should be being spent on Police or on tackling the causes of crime to prevent crime happening in the first place.

The only winners from CCTV are the security industry. They want us all to live in fear so they can rake it simultaneously raping the public purse whilst destroying our hard won freedoms and privacy.

SAY NO TO CCTV.

Oh, and I noticed yesterday that the CCTV camera at Charing Cross now has a picture drawn by an 8 year old at one of our local primaries attached to it. It has been put there by the council. It simply says," Now we can speak to you as well as see you".

It refers to the fact that the cameras at Charing Cross now have speakers so the Jimmy Savilles at Council Spy HQ can criticise passers by at Charing Cross at will.

To my mind this is a chilling development. Teaching children that it is acceptable to be watched on CCTV as they go about their private business in the street is tantamount to brianwashing. Obviously, the CCTV industry and the Jimmy Savilles who monitor their equipment are making sure the future generation will accept 24 Hour surveillance.

So, you may get a camera in your home sooner than you think and yes even one in your bedroom.

I rest my case.
[quote][p][bold]Thepleb[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]porl112[/bold] wrote: Surely if the money spent on CCTV cameras had been used to employ more Police last years riots could have neen prevented in the first place or at least better controlled. Surely as a serving Police Officer you understand that the greatest deterrent to crime is having a real live Police Officer on patrol? As a member of the public confronted by rioters which would you rather have a Police Officer present who can arrest the person damaging your property and cart him off to the station or a CCTV camera to record the destruction of your property and maybe even a personal attack upon your own person? I know which I would rather have. I have no problem with CCTV in the shopping areas of town and around the town centre but Pt Cartlidge is right these intimidating cameras are appearing everywhere now and must be costing a fortune? Surely it is better to spend any money on real Police than on useless CCTV which I notice didn't stop that girl being attacked in Argyle Street this week! We should have Coppers not cameras. CCTV is just money for the security industry and high council taxes and intimidation for the rest of us. A Wirral Council Tax Payer[/p][/quote]I agree there should be more police but the police can't be everywhere and CCTV assists us,so I would rather have more CCTV. The girl attacked in Birkenhead there were no police officers present but the CCTV captured the incident and the person responsible has been caught. I am not sure why anyone but would be intimidated by a camera they are used in every shop you walk into and if you are doing nothing wrong what is the problem.[/p][/quote]I have no problem with cameras on private property or in shops. It is CCTV in public spaces that is the worry. Video surveillance has not been proven effective In Britain, where we have more cameras in public places than any other nation on earth, sociologists studying the issue have found that they have not reduced crime. Once the crime and offence figures were adjusted to take account of the general downward trend in crimes and offences reductions were noted in certain categories but there was no evidence to suggest that the cameras had reduced crime overall in the city centre. In addition, U.S. government experts on security technology, noting that "monitoring video screens is both boring and mesmerizing," have found in experiments that "after only 20 minutes of watching and evaluating monitor screens, the attention of most individuals has degenerated to well below acceptable levels." CCTV is also susceptible to abuse One problem with creating such a powerful surveillance system is that experience tells us it will inevitably be abused. There are five ways that surveillance-camera systems are likely to be misused: 1. Criminal abuse Surveillance systems present law enforcement "bad apples" with a tempting opportunity for criminal misuse. In 1997, for example, a top-ranking police official in Washington, DC was caught using police databases to gather information on patrons of a gay club. By looking up the license plate numbers of cars parked at the club and researching the backgrounds of the vehicles' owners, he tried to blackmail patrons who were married. Imagine what someone like that could do with a citywide spy-camera system like the one we now have on Wirral ! And of course I am sure you are aware of our own Birkenhead CCTV **** video doing the rounds? A few years back somebody at Wirral CCTV copied some of the recordings of young couples copulating in various outdoor locations around Birkenhead and released it onto the internet. There were also videos released casting shame on the town showing drunks fighting and urinating in doorways. 2. Institutional abuse Sometimes, bad policies are set at the top, and an entire law enforcement agency is turned toward abusive ends. That is especially prone to happen in periods of social turmoil and intense conflict over government policies. During the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War, for example, the FBI – as well as many individual police departments around the nation – conducted illegal operations to spy upon and harass political activists who were challenging racial segregation and the Vietnam War. This concern is especially justified today since the current rancid right wing government seems hell bent on making the poor poorer and removing peoples rights to a home and any kind of support should they fall on hard times. This is bound to create more social divisions and therefore social and political conflict. 3. Abuse for personal purposes Powerful surveillance tools also create temptations to abuse them for personal purposes. An investigation by the Detroit Free Press, for example, showed that a database available to Michigan law enforcement was used by officers to help their friends or themselves stalk women, threaten motorists after traffic altercations, and track estranged spouses. 4. Discriminatory targeting Video camera systems are operated by humans who bring to the job all their existing prejudices and biases. In the UK, camera operators have been found to focus disproportionately on people of color. According to a sociological study of how the systems were operated, "Black people were between one-and-a-half and two-and-a-half times more likely to be surveilled than one would expect from their presence in the population." 5. Voyeurism Experts studying how the camera systems in Britain are operated have also found that the mostly male (and probably bored) operators frequently use the cameras to voyeuristically spy on women. Fully one in 10 women were targeted for entirely voyeuristic reasons, the researchers found. Have I changed your mind yet? If not perhaps you might care to look at this link which shows that councils have spent 500 million pounds on CCTV in the last four years alone! When it comes to CCTV it seems there is no austerity. And, of course, Wirral is about to have to slash essential services to our old folks and other vulnerable groups. http://www.bigbrothe rwatch.org.uk/home/2 012/02/price-privacy -councils-spend-521m .html And have a look at this link too. It explains how councils have abused their powers to access our information held by the DVLA to enforce the most petty of offences. Do you really think we should be trusting these guys to 'guard' us with CCTV? http://www.bigbrothe rwatch.org.uk/home/2 012/12/dvla-tackle-2 94-public-organisati ons-for-database-abu se.html And, could I ask you where you think this will end? We started with CCTV in shops. Then it was put in our town centres. Now it is appearing everywhere across our town. Are you in favour of putting it in our homes too? Perhaps in your bedroom to make sure you aren't smacking your wife? After all you have nothing to worry about if you are not doing anything wrong have you? You may think that sounds far fetched but have a look at this link. It shows how hidden CCTV is being used in schools across the UK. And that includes school toilets and changing rooms. http://www.bigbrothe rwatch.org.uk/home/2 012/12/dvla-tackle-2 94-public-organisati ons-for-database-abu se.html Imagine if Sir Jimmy Saville had got himself a job monitoring those cameras! Imagine the fun he could have had ! Still in favour? Then, let me go on. Video surveillance also has a chilling effect on public life The growing presence of public cameras will bring subtle but profound changes to the character of our public spaces. When citizens are being watched by the authorities -- or aware they might be watched at any time -- they are more self-conscious and less free-wheeling. As syndicated columnist Jacob Sullum has pointed out, "knowing that you are being watched by armed government agents tends to put a damper on things. You don't want to offend them or otherwise call attention to yourself." Eventually, he warns, "people may learn to be careful about the books and periodicals they read in public, avoiding titles that might alarm unseen observers. They may also put more thought into how they dress, lest they look like terrorists, gang members, druggies or hookers." Indeed, the studies of cameras in the UK found that people deemed to be "out of time and place" with the surroundings were subjected to prolonged surveillance. And finally, the latest CCTV systems are able to identify a person by their face and their walk in seconds. Can you imagine the immense and terrifying power that will give to any kind of fascist government that may get themselves elected in the future? Can you imagine how much more difficult life would have been for the Jewish and French Resistance in the Second World War had the Natzis had access to such technology? No, CCTV is expensive. It doesn't prevent crime it merely displaces it. It creates the fear of crime. It kills individuality, free protest and difference. It encourages snooping and corrupts the camera operators by creating voyeurs and peeping Toms and it costs a fortune. Money that should be being spent on Police or on tackling the causes of crime to prevent crime happening in the first place. The only winners from CCTV are the security industry. They want us all to live in fear so they can rake it simultaneously raping the public purse whilst destroying our hard won freedoms and privacy. SAY NO TO CCTV. Oh, and I noticed yesterday that the CCTV camera at Charing Cross now has a picture drawn by an 8 year old at one of our local primaries attached to it. It has been put there by the council. It simply says," Now we can speak to you as well as see you". It refers to the fact that the cameras at Charing Cross now have speakers so the Jimmy Savilles at Council Spy HQ can criticise passers by at Charing Cross at will. To my mind this is a chilling development. Teaching children that it is acceptable to be watched on CCTV as they go about their private business in the street is tantamount to brianwashing. Obviously, the CCTV industry and the Jimmy Savilles who monitor their equipment are making sure the future generation will accept 24 Hour surveillance. So, you may get a camera in your home sooner than you think and yes even one in your bedroom. I rest my case. porl112

11:33pm Sat 12 Jan 13

Rob Blahzil says...

CCTV, probably why so many keep their hoods up. When you see the poor quality of some of the recordings, you wonder why they bothered. A Mother wouldn`t recognise her own son, especially with his hood up.
There is another CCTV camera outside the Bargain Booze in Grange Road West. Apparently, that one is to monitor traffic, what little of it there is. It doesn`t stop cars from speeding and certainly didn`t stop shots being fired at a house in Westbourne Road.
CCTV, probably why so many keep their hoods up. When you see the poor quality of some of the recordings, you wonder why they bothered. A Mother wouldn`t recognise her own son, especially with his hood up. There is another CCTV camera outside the Bargain Booze in Grange Road West. Apparently, that one is to monitor traffic, what little of it there is. It doesn`t stop cars from speeding and certainly didn`t stop shots being fired at a house in Westbourne Road. Rob Blahzil

6:02pm Sun 13 Jan 13

Positive thinker says...

Honest people should be all for CCTV and lots of it
Honest people should be all for CCTV and lots of it Positive thinker

8:59pm Sun 13 Jan 13

porl112 says...

Positive thinker wrote:
Honest people should be all for CCTV and lots of it
You obviously either work for the CCTV industry or you haven't read my post above so here it is again...

I have no problem with cameras on private property or in shops. It is CCTV in public spaces that is the worry.

Video surveillance has not been proven effective

In Britain, where we have more cameras in public places than any other nation on earth, sociologists studying the issue have found that they have not reduced crime. Once the crime and offence figures were adjusted to take account of the general downward trend in crimes and offences reductions were noted in certain categories but there was no evidence to suggest that the cameras had reduced crime overall in the city centre.

In addition, U.S. government experts on security technology, noting that "monitoring video screens is both boring and mesmerizing," have found in experiments that "after only 20 minutes of watching and evaluating monitor screens, the attention of most individuals has degenerated to well below acceptable levels."

CCTV is also susceptible to abuse

One problem with creating such a powerful surveillance system is that experience tells us it will inevitably be abused. There are five ways that surveillance-camera systems are likely to be misused:

1. Criminal abuse

Surveillance systems present law enforcement "bad apples" with a tempting opportunity for criminal misuse. In 1997, for example, a top-ranking police official in Washington, DC was caught using police databases to gather information on patrons of a gay club. By looking up the license plate numbers of cars parked at the club and researching the backgrounds of the vehicles' owners, he tried to blackmail patrons who were married. Imagine what someone like that could do with a citywide spy-camera system like the one we now have on Wirral !

And of course I am sure you are aware of our own Birkenhead CCTV **** video doing the rounds? A few years back somebody at Wirral CCTV copied some of the recordings of young couples copulating in various outdoor locations around Birkenhead and released it onto the internet. There were also videos released casting shame on the town showing drunks fighting and urinating in doorways.

2. Institutional abuse

Sometimes, bad policies are set at the top, and an entire law enforcement agency is turned toward abusive ends. That is especially prone to happen in periods of social turmoil and intense conflict over government policies. During the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War, for example, the FBI – as well as many individual police departments around the nation – conducted illegal operations to spy upon and harass political activists who were challenging racial segregation and the Vietnam War.

This concern is especially justified today since the current rancid right wing government seems hell bent on making the poor poorer and removing peoples rights to a home and any kind of support should they fall on hard times. This is bound to create more social divisions and therefore social and political conflict.

3. Abuse for personal purposes

Powerful surveillance tools also create temptations to abuse them for personal purposes. An investigation by the Detroit Free Press, for example, showed that a database available to Michigan law enforcement was used by officers to help their friends or themselves stalk women, threaten motorists after traffic altercations, and track estranged spouses.

4. Discriminatory targeting

Video camera systems are operated by humans who bring to the job all their existing prejudices and biases. In the UK, camera operators have been found to focus disproportionately on people of color. According to a sociological study of how the systems were operated, "Black people were between one-and-a-half and two-and-a-half times more likely to be surveilled than one would expect from their presence in the population."

5. Voyeurism

Experts studying how the camera systems in Britain are operated have also found that the mostly male (and probably bored) operators frequently use the cameras to voyeuristically spy on women. Fully one in 10 women were targeted for entirely voyeuristic reasons, the researchers found.

Have I changed your mind yet?

If not perhaps you might care to look at this link which shows that councils have spent 500 million pounds on CCTV in the last four years alone! When it comes to CCTV it seems there is no austerity. And, of course, Wirral is about to have to slash essential services to our old folks and other vulnerable groups.

http://www.bigbrothe

rwatch.org.uk/home/2

012/02/price-privacy

-councils-spend-521m

.html

And have a look at this link too. It explains how councils have abused their powers to access our information held by the DVLA to enforce the most petty of offences. Do you really think we should be trusting these guys to 'guard' us with CCTV?

http://www.bigbrothe

rwatch.org.uk/home/2

012/12/dvla-tackle-2

94-public-organisati

ons-for-database-abu

se.html

And, could I ask you where you think this will end? We started with CCTV in shops. Then it was put in our town centres. Now it is appearing everywhere across our town. Are you in favour of putting it in our homes too? Perhaps in your bedroom to make sure you aren't smacking your wife? After all you have nothing to worry about if you are not doing anything wrong have you?

You may think that sounds far fetched but have a look at this link. It shows how hidden CCTV is being used in schools across the UK. And that includes school toilets and changing rooms.

http://www.bigbrothe

rwatch.org.uk/home/2

012/12/dvla-tackle-2

94-public-organisati

ons-for-database-abu

se.html

Imagine if Sir Jimmy Saville had got himself a job monitoring those cameras! Imagine the fun he could have had !

Still in favour? Then, let me go on.

Video surveillance also has a chilling effect on public life

The growing presence of public cameras will bring subtle but profound changes to the character of our public spaces. When citizens are being watched by the authorities -- or aware they might be watched at any time -- they are more self-conscious and less free-wheeling. As syndicated columnist Jacob Sullum has pointed out, "knowing that you are being watched by armed government agents tends to put a damper on things. You don't want to offend them or otherwise call attention to yourself." Eventually, he warns, "people may learn to be careful about the books and periodicals they read in public, avoiding titles that might alarm unseen observers. They may also put more thought into how they dress, lest they look like terrorists, gang members, druggies or hookers." Indeed, the studies of cameras in the UK found that people deemed to be "out of time and place" with the surroundings were subjected to prolonged surveillance.

And finally, the latest CCTV systems are able to identify a person by their face and their walk in seconds. Can you imagine the immense and terrifying power that will give to any kind of fascist government that may get themselves elected in the future?

Can you imagine how much more difficult life would have been for the Jewish and French Resistance in the Second World War had the Natzis had access to such technology?

No, CCTV is expensive. It doesn't prevent crime it merely displaces it. It creates the fear of crime. It kills individuality, free protest and difference. It encourages snooping and corrupts the camera operators by creating voyeurs and peeping Toms and it costs a fortune. Money that should be being spent on Police or on tackling the causes of crime to prevent crime happening in the first place.

The only winners from CCTV are the security industry. They want us all to live in fear so they can rake it simultaneously raping the public purse whilst destroying our hard won freedoms and privacy.

SAY NO TO CCTV.

Oh, and I noticed yesterday that the CCTV camera at Charing Cross now has a picture drawn by an 8 year old at one of our local primaries attached to it. It has been put there by the council. It simply says," Now we can speak to you as well as see you".

It refers to the fact that the cameras at Charing Cross now have speakers so the Jimmy Savilles at Council Spy HQ can criticise passers by at Charing Cross at will.

To my mind this is a chilling development. Teaching children that it is acceptable to be watched on CCTV as they go about their private business in the street is tantamount to brianwashing. Obviously, the CCTV industry and the Jimmy Savilles who monitor their equipment are making sure the future generation will accept 24 Hour surveillance.

So, you may get a camera in your home sooner than you think and yes even one in your bedroom.

I rest my case.
[quote][p][bold]Positive thinker[/bold] wrote: Honest people should be all for CCTV and lots of it[/p][/quote]You obviously either work for the CCTV industry or you haven't read my post above so here it is again... I have no problem with cameras on private property or in shops. It is CCTV in public spaces that is the worry. Video surveillance has not been proven effective In Britain, where we have more cameras in public places than any other nation on earth, sociologists studying the issue have found that they have not reduced crime. Once the crime and offence figures were adjusted to take account of the general downward trend in crimes and offences reductions were noted in certain categories but there was no evidence to suggest that the cameras had reduced crime overall in the city centre. In addition, U.S. government experts on security technology, noting that "monitoring video screens is both boring and mesmerizing," have found in experiments that "after only 20 minutes of watching and evaluating monitor screens, the attention of most individuals has degenerated to well below acceptable levels." CCTV is also susceptible to abuse One problem with creating such a powerful surveillance system is that experience tells us it will inevitably be abused. There are five ways that surveillance-camera systems are likely to be misused: 1. Criminal abuse Surveillance systems present law enforcement "bad apples" with a tempting opportunity for criminal misuse. In 1997, for example, a top-ranking police official in Washington, DC was caught using police databases to gather information on patrons of a gay club. By looking up the license plate numbers of cars parked at the club and researching the backgrounds of the vehicles' owners, he tried to blackmail patrons who were married. Imagine what someone like that could do with a citywide spy-camera system like the one we now have on Wirral ! And of course I am sure you are aware of our own Birkenhead CCTV **** video doing the rounds? A few years back somebody at Wirral CCTV copied some of the recordings of young couples copulating in various outdoor locations around Birkenhead and released it onto the internet. There were also videos released casting shame on the town showing drunks fighting and urinating in doorways. 2. Institutional abuse Sometimes, bad policies are set at the top, and an entire law enforcement agency is turned toward abusive ends. That is especially prone to happen in periods of social turmoil and intense conflict over government policies. During the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War, for example, the FBI – as well as many individual police departments around the nation – conducted illegal operations to spy upon and harass political activists who were challenging racial segregation and the Vietnam War. This concern is especially justified today since the current rancid right wing government seems hell bent on making the poor poorer and removing peoples rights to a home and any kind of support should they fall on hard times. This is bound to create more social divisions and therefore social and political conflict. 3. Abuse for personal purposes Powerful surveillance tools also create temptations to abuse them for personal purposes. An investigation by the Detroit Free Press, for example, showed that a database available to Michigan law enforcement was used by officers to help their friends or themselves stalk women, threaten motorists after traffic altercations, and track estranged spouses. 4. Discriminatory targeting Video camera systems are operated by humans who bring to the job all their existing prejudices and biases. In the UK, camera operators have been found to focus disproportionately on people of color. According to a sociological study of how the systems were operated, "Black people were between one-and-a-half and two-and-a-half times more likely to be surveilled than one would expect from their presence in the population." 5. Voyeurism Experts studying how the camera systems in Britain are operated have also found that the mostly male (and probably bored) operators frequently use the cameras to voyeuristically spy on women. Fully one in 10 women were targeted for entirely voyeuristic reasons, the researchers found. Have I changed your mind yet? If not perhaps you might care to look at this link which shows that councils have spent 500 million pounds on CCTV in the last four years alone! When it comes to CCTV it seems there is no austerity. And, of course, Wirral is about to have to slash essential services to our old folks and other vulnerable groups. http://www.bigbrothe rwatch.org.uk/home/2 012/02/price-privacy -councils-spend-521m .html And have a look at this link too. It explains how councils have abused their powers to access our information held by the DVLA to enforce the most petty of offences. Do you really think we should be trusting these guys to 'guard' us with CCTV? http://www.bigbrothe rwatch.org.uk/home/2 012/12/dvla-tackle-2 94-public-organisati ons-for-database-abu se.html And, could I ask you where you think this will end? We started with CCTV in shops. Then it was put in our town centres. Now it is appearing everywhere across our town. Are you in favour of putting it in our homes too? Perhaps in your bedroom to make sure you aren't smacking your wife? After all you have nothing to worry about if you are not doing anything wrong have you? You may think that sounds far fetched but have a look at this link. It shows how hidden CCTV is being used in schools across the UK. And that includes school toilets and changing rooms. http://www.bigbrothe rwatch.org.uk/home/2 012/12/dvla-tackle-2 94-public-organisati ons-for-database-abu se.html Imagine if Sir Jimmy Saville had got himself a job monitoring those cameras! Imagine the fun he could have had ! Still in favour? Then, let me go on. Video surveillance also has a chilling effect on public life The growing presence of public cameras will bring subtle but profound changes to the character of our public spaces. When citizens are being watched by the authorities -- or aware they might be watched at any time -- they are more self-conscious and less free-wheeling. As syndicated columnist Jacob Sullum has pointed out, "knowing that you are being watched by armed government agents tends to put a damper on things. You don't want to offend them or otherwise call attention to yourself." Eventually, he warns, "people may learn to be careful about the books and periodicals they read in public, avoiding titles that might alarm unseen observers. They may also put more thought into how they dress, lest they look like terrorists, gang members, druggies or hookers." Indeed, the studies of cameras in the UK found that people deemed to be "out of time and place" with the surroundings were subjected to prolonged surveillance. And finally, the latest CCTV systems are able to identify a person by their face and their walk in seconds. Can you imagine the immense and terrifying power that will give to any kind of fascist government that may get themselves elected in the future? Can you imagine how much more difficult life would have been for the Jewish and French Resistance in the Second World War had the Natzis had access to such technology? No, CCTV is expensive. It doesn't prevent crime it merely displaces it. It creates the fear of crime. It kills individuality, free protest and difference. It encourages snooping and corrupts the camera operators by creating voyeurs and peeping Toms and it costs a fortune. Money that should be being spent on Police or on tackling the causes of crime to prevent crime happening in the first place. The only winners from CCTV are the security industry. They want us all to live in fear so they can rake it simultaneously raping the public purse whilst destroying our hard won freedoms and privacy. SAY NO TO CCTV. Oh, and I noticed yesterday that the CCTV camera at Charing Cross now has a picture drawn by an 8 year old at one of our local primaries attached to it. It has been put there by the council. It simply says," Now we can speak to you as well as see you". It refers to the fact that the cameras at Charing Cross now have speakers so the Jimmy Savilles at Council Spy HQ can criticise passers by at Charing Cross at will. To my mind this is a chilling development. Teaching children that it is acceptable to be watched on CCTV as they go about their private business in the street is tantamount to brianwashing. Obviously, the CCTV industry and the Jimmy Savilles who monitor their equipment are making sure the future generation will accept 24 Hour surveillance. So, you may get a camera in your home sooner than you think and yes even one in your bedroom. I rest my case. porl112

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree