Lessons on Hillsborough are a step too far

WHILE I have the deepest sympathy for all the victims of the Hillsborough disaster and understand their families need for truth and justice, I feel that agreeing to go on and teach lessons about the disaster is one step to far.

There are more important things to focus on in our schools like improving the reading and writing skills of all our young people and ensuring that they are equipped with the appropriate skills and knowledge to go on and prosper in their chosen career paths?

Surely a brief chat and discussion about what happened at Hillsborough would be sufficient time to focus on this event rather than lessons on the subject?

What grade will be attained? What relevance will it have in the work place or on a CV?

James by email.

Comments (3)

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1:52pm Wed 7 Nov 12

don't look back in anger says...

jft96. w.n.w.a.
jft96. w.n.w.a. don't look back in anger

1:52pm Wed 7 Nov 12

don't look back in anger says...

jft96. w.n.w.a.
jft96. w.n.w.a. don't look back in anger

8:35am Sat 10 Nov 12

littlestar84 says...

I think it's a wonderful idea, and a way of bringing academia to life, and perhaps even encouraging higher education to school pupils. It will engage the pupils in critical thinking skills, examining 'evidence' and looking at the panel's findings. Teaching pupils to not accept anything at face value and to think for themselves, and examine carefully, are crucial tools.

With it being such a contemporary topic it will appeal to the youth. It could occur in media lessons, english language lessons (writing reports, examing the semantics) history lessons, politics, sociology, psychology, criminology... the list in endless. I fully support using such thought provoking real-life events to promote study skills, and of course to honour and remember those whose lives were taken on that day.
I think it's a wonderful idea, and a way of bringing academia to life, and perhaps even encouraging higher education to school pupils. It will engage the pupils in critical thinking skills, examining 'evidence' and looking at the panel's findings. Teaching pupils to not accept anything at face value and to think for themselves, and examine carefully, are crucial tools. With it being such a contemporary topic it will appeal to the youth. It could occur in media lessons, english language lessons (writing reports, examing the semantics) history lessons, politics, sociology, psychology, criminology... the list in endless. I fully support using such thought provoking real-life events to promote study skills, and of course to honour and remember those whose lives were taken on that day. littlestar84

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